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3 Ways to Save Energy and Money in the Kitchen

Oven

As heating costs begin to rise, it’s nice to find ways to save money in other areas of our home. There are a few things we can do to reduce our energy usage, which in turn will save us money. Here are few things to try:

Wash your dishes in the dishwasher but let them air dry.

A dishwasher uses more energy to dry dishes than to wash them. If your dishwasher doesn’t have an automatic air-dry switch, turn off the control knob after the final rinse and prop the door open to let moisture escape.

Don’t preheat the oven.

Preheating isn’t necessary to cook food thoroughly except when food requires high temperatures and slow cooking times.

Clean refrigerator coils twice a year (more often if you have pets).

Condenser coils are located at the bottom or rear of your refrigerator. If dust and dirt accumulates on them, as much as 25 percent more energy is required to maintain the proper temperature. I’m really curious to know if anyone has cleaned their refrigerator coils before!


How do you save energy and money in the Kitchen?

  • Amanda Jayne November 9, 2010, 9:58 pm

    I have never cleaned my fridge coils, but now I’m thinking that I should! I’m really embarrassed to say that I didn’t even know I was suppose to…

    Reply
  • Deborah November 9, 2010, 10:39 pm

    We have an almost 3-year old fridge and have never cleaned the coils. Um, how do you go about cleaning the coils on a built-in fridge? It is flush with the cabinets, is cleaning still necessary?

    Reply
    • iDreamOfClean November 10, 2010, 10:30 am

      If you can’t pull the fridge out you may want to see if you can get to them from the front. If that doesn’t work, I’m at a loss. Wonder if anyone else has the same situation and can help?

      Reply
  • Janene November 10, 2010, 1:10 am

    I have 2 cats and recently decided to clean my refrigerator coils. It was so full of hair and dust it was disgusting! It made me wonder how often I should do that and if other people clean theirs?

    Reply
    • iDreamOfClean November 10, 2010, 10:29 am

      I’m so glad to hear of someone who’s actually cleaned their refrigerator coils! I’m going to try it and post a vlog soon so we’ll see how it goes :-)

      Reply
      • Amanda Jayne November 10, 2010, 11:06 am

        I would love to see a vlog! I don’t have a clue where to start.

        Reply
  • 'Becca November 11, 2010, 2:12 pm

    Something I’ve learned to do in the kitchen and elsewhere is avoid excessive lighting. My mom’s kitchen has task lighting for the stove, various counter areas, etc., and it’s great for seeing what you’re doing, but when you have one of those lights on often you don’t need the overhead light as well. Only use the lights you need. My home now has only one kitchen light fixture which uses a wasteful type of bulb, so we turn it on only when we need bright, even light. The rest of the time, we use a gooseneck desk lamp that’s on top of the refrigerator, bent backward so the light bounces off the ceiling; it uses 1/6 as much electricity as the ceiling light but provides enough light for many tasks.

    Reply
  • Jennifer January 11, 2011, 10:58 am

    I cleaned my coils this past weekend on the current house and the house we just bought! I do it 2-3 times a year.

    Reply
  • Miriam December 29, 2011, 8:41 am

    We cleaned our refrigerator coils this spring when I spring cleaned the kitchen. I should add that to my “fall cleaning” that I’m still working on (even though it’s almost the new year, hahah!!) little by little. I forget what all it took, but I think we had to take a little panel off the back of the frige to get to the coils. My DH is a very handy-man, so he knew what to do.

    Reply